Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) term covers Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the internal surface of colon. Crohn’s disease may sometimes cover all parts of gastrointestinal system from mouth to anus, but is mostly located on last part of small intestine (terminal ileum) and on colon (large intestine), and contrary to ulcerative colitis, causes an inflammation which may spread over all layers of intestine wall. At active inflammation periods, internal surface of intestine is red and swollen (bulgy), ulcerous and bleeding.

Ulcerative Colitis: Most common and known symptoms of ulcerative colitis are diarrhea, urgent need to defecate, abdomen pain, and rectal bleeding (blood in feces) together with or without defecation. Some patients may feel themselves inappetent and fatigue and may have lost weight. Bleeding is generally not heavy, but sometimes may be severe, and may in turn lead to anemia. Arthralgia, swelling and reddening in eyes, and hepatic problems may develop. These problems generally recover after colitis is cured.

Crohn’s Disease: Most common symptoms of Crohn’s Disease are abdomen pain felt particularly in right lower quadrant, and diarrhea and loss of weight. Rectal bleeding and fever may also be seen. Chronic hidden or manifest bleeding may pave the way for anemia. Growth retardation is commonly reported in children suffering from advanced Crohn’s disease. Arthralgia, swelling and reddening in eyes, and hepatic problems may develop.